Trouble with your lit review? Try the “Daisy” diagram.

I hate doing literature reviews. I always feel I have not read enough. I worry that what I write will be ‘wrong’ because I have missed some vital piece of literature. These feelings never seem to entirely go away, even though I have been publishing papers for over a decade. I can certainly relate to […]

via Using diagrams as research aides — The Thesis Whisperer

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Study on call backs for law internship shows gender & class bias

A new study on law school internship hiring has yielded interesting and dismaying results regarding the influence of both social class and gender on hiring. A c.v. study found that call back rates for men track class indicators, with men having c.v.s indicating lower class origins markedly disfavored relative to men with markers for higher […]

via Social Class, Gender, and Bias — Feminist Philosophers

Stairways

What is a stairway? What does a stairway represent? What do you think of when you hear the word “stairway?”

I considered all of these questions while reading today’s prompt on The Daily Post:

Stairway

Since I’ve been thinking about my career trajectory fairly often lately, I suppose it makes sense that my thoughts immediately drifted to how the image of a stairway relates to one’s career.

A career is like a stairway which leads to multiple rooms. More accurately, perhaps, it’s like multiple stairways in an office building which houses many types of businesses. If you find your passion early on and/or if the economy thrives, you might stop at the first level. You might enter a room and stay there. If you have multiple interests or if you’re experiencing job insecurity, you might travel from room to room before going back to the stairway to see what other opportunities await. Maybe you’ll stop on the stairway, exhausted, and wait to pursue new opportunities.

After taking some time off from actively seeking employment, I got back on the career stairway. I see my career now as one in which I continuously return to the stairway, moving between levels as I figure out what type of work is likely to be most rewarding personally and professionally.

If your career were a stairway, what would it look like?

Or do you have an entirely different perception of the word “stairway?” Share it! https://wordpress.com/read/feeds/27030/posts/1012199947

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Superman and Diaspora, by Child of the Cosmos

Critique like this is why I study literature and media, and especially why I study speculative fiction.

A great example of this can be seen oddly enough in Man of Steel when Lois Lane asks Superman what the S on his chest stands for. He tells it means hope in his people’s language and Lois responds by saying that here it is a S.

Superman is expected to accept this new reality and to let go of his culture and understand that he must rather assimilate instead. That he must let go of what it means in his language and culture and understand that it is now a S.

It is the internal struggle of the Jew. To survive in Diaspora. To endure and still maintain a sense of self and one’s roots. To keep your people’s language, customs, and culture alive especially surrounded by a world where you are the alien.

Professormex, The Nerds of Color, on “Elysium and the 1%”

Professormex notes:

“..while Elysium whitewashes the main character, it’s important to note the character is (supposed to be) a person of color, and, at least in theory3, is ultimately in reclaiming paradigm shift.”

There is so much to consider in this analysis of Elysium. I think that it’s important that the protagonist died (in the context of the casting choice of Damon as a white, male “savior”), leaving the future for Frey Santiago and her daughter. Yet the film would have been so much more powerful in some respects if Frey had been the primary protagonist!

via Elysium and the 1% — thenerdsofcolor